Recent bulletin on Carboxytherapy and Mesotherapy

Here is a recent press release from the Physicians Coalition for Injectable Safety – a group of 7 American, Canadian and International Surgery groups, including plastic surgeons, facial plastic surgeons and ophthalmic surgeons – who review & study the latest and best methods regarding injectable cosmetic products. For the record, I agree with this bulletin, and do not currently recommend mesotherapy and carboxytherapy, based on lack of proven efficacy.

PHYSICIAN GROUP URGES CONSUMERS TO BE AWARE OF NON-APPROVED COSMETIC INJECTIONS

July 29, 2009 – The Physicians Coalition for Injectable Safety today issued a consumer warning about carboxytherapy and mesotherapy injections. These products, touting everything from cellulite treatment to weight loss are not FDA approved, and do not have clinical data that demonstrates results or safety.

Carboxytherapy uses carbon dioxide gas injected under the skin to reduce the look of cellulite, treatment of dark under-eye circles, and stretch marks and is also touted for fat sculpting on the face and the body. “Although many websites or providers claim carboxytherapy is safe and FDA approved, it has not been clinically tested or FDA approved for these purposes,” says Coalition leader Robert Weiss, MD of Baltimore, MD. “Carboxytherapy for use around the eyes is especially dangerous. It could potentially release gas bubbles into blood vessels causing blindness. In addition, the risks of putting carbon dioxide in your body are currently unknown.”

Mesotherapy, also known as injection lipolysis, is a mixture of vitamins, drugs and enzymes that are compounded (mixed together) to make the injected substance. “There is no conclusive, authoritative information that exists, such as unbiased, peer-reviewed clinical studies that meets the standards of an accepted medical journal, measuring both the efficacy and safety of mesotherapy,” says Coalition leader Mark Jewell, MD, Eugene, Oregon. “We don’t know the safety or efficacy of these compounds and, until there exists credible evidence, consumers are advised not to have these injections.”

The Coalition urges consumers to be very selective about cosmetic treatments, and the individuals who provide them. “Only accept treatment prescribed by a qualified physician and administered under that physician’s supervision. Whether an injection or treatment is to treat aging conditions, to treat cellulite or a similar body contouring condition, whether it sounds reasonable or too good to be true, you should always be aware of false claims,” says Coalition leader Jeffrey Kenkel, MD of Dallas, TX. “Verifying that the drug or device that is recommended for your injection is FDA approved is an important first step. It should be approved specifically for cosmetic use as prescribed or similarly to what is prescribed for you.”

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